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Parents share mixed emotions as students return amid COVID-19 outbreak

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Parents in Maine are voicing a range of concerns as students return to class this week. With the increase in COVID-19 cases, some families are concerned about returning to in-person learning after the holidays. While no district has announced any form of temporary transition to distance learning, some parents are proactively stating that they believe such action would be unacceptable. “I think January is going to be a very difficult month. It’s just my feeling. I feel like it’s probably going to end up going remote. It’s probably inevitable, ”said Yarmouth parent Lisa Littlejohn. The mother of primary-age twins said any interruption in in-person learning would be unwelcome. “We are vaccinated. I mean, what more can we do at this point? We have to say, “Enough is enough. Life must go on, ”said Littejohn. In a letter to parents ahead of the return from schools on Monday, Yarmouth Superintendent Andrew Dolloff renewed the district’s commitment to classroom learning, but also said Yarmouth schools would not escape the surge cases of COVID-19. the point where we can’t transport students to school or provide instruction during the day, ”Dolloff said. Dolloff said Monday that Yarmouth was adopting new guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shortening quarantine and isolation periods from 10 days to 5. In a letter to families over the weekend, schools in Portland said that they kept existing protocols in place. “Our medical team is carefully reviewing the revised guidelines and will go in the appropriate direction as soon as possible. Until then, the COVID protocols in place before the break will remain in place for now, ”the letter to Portland parents said. “Sitting in the queue, I was like, ‘Oh my God, this is crazy,’” said Portland parent Beth Taylor, describing her mixed feelings about bringing her kindergarten son to school. Taylor’s daughter, who is enrolled in a private preschool, is immunocompromised and is staying at home for the time being. Taylor said she was eager to see the results of the tests bundled. “It could change what we do with school for him. If it’s rampant in the school, I don’t know if I can send it, ”Taylor said. For some parents, the New Year brings a frustrating level of uncertainty. “I’m a freelance graphic designer and can’t really work while my kid is at home,” Taylor said. Littlejohn said she was concerned about school buildings being closed. “Fear of that, social isolation and loss of learning and all the rest of the ramifications of school closures should take priority,” Littlejohn said. On Monday and Tuesday, most districts offering bulk testing are collecting The results, likely to be released within 48 hours, will give parents in Maine the first glimpse of any possible spread of COVID-19 in school communities after the holidays.

Parents in Maine are voicing a range of concerns as students return to class this week.

With the increase in COVID-19 cases, some families are concerned about returning to in-person learning after the holidays.

While no district has announced any form of temporary transition to distance learning, some parents are proactively stating that they believe such action would be unacceptable.

“I think January is going to be a very difficult month. It’s just my feeling. I feel like it’s probably going to end up going remote. It’s probably inevitable, ”said Yarmouth parent Lisa Littlejohn.

The mother of primary-age twins said any interruption in in-person learning would be unwelcome.

“We are vaccinated. I mean, what more can we do at this point? We have to say, “Enough is enough. Life must go on, ”said Littejohn.

In a letter to parents ahead of Monday’s return to schools, Yarmouth Superintendent Andrew Dolloff renewed the district’s commitment to classroom learning, but also said Yarmouth schools would not escape the surge in COVID-19 cases.

“It would be interrupted if the number of our employees were to decline to the point where we can no longer transport students to school or provide instruction during the day,” Dolloff said.

Dolloff said Monday that Yarmouth was adopting new guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shortening quarantine and isolation periods from 10 days to 5.

In a letter to families over the weekend, Portland schools said they were keeping existing protocols in place.

“Our medical team is carefully reviewing the revised guidelines and will go in the appropriate direction as soon as possible. Until then, the COVID protocols in place before the break will remain in place for now, ”the letter to Portland parents said.

“Sitting in the queue, I was like, ‘Oh my God, this is crazy,’” said Portland parent Beth Taylor, describing her mixed feelings about bringing her kindergarten son to school.

Taylor’s daughter, who is enrolled in a private preschool, is immunocompromised and is staying at home for the time being. Taylor said she was eager to see the results of the tests bundled.

“It could change what we do with school for him. If it’s rampant in the school, I don’t know if I can send it, ”Taylor said.

For some parents, the New Year brings a frustrating level of uncertainty.

“I’m a freelance graphic designer and can’t really work while my kid is at home,” Taylor said.

Littlejohn said she was concerned about school buildings being closed.

“The fear of this, social isolation and loss of learning and all the ramifications of school closings should take priority,” Littlejohn said.

On Monday and Tuesday, most districts offering pooled testing collect samples.

The results, likely to be released within 48 hours, will give parents in Maine the first glimpse of any possible spread of COVID-19 in school communities after the holidays.

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