Home Illustration Who can score the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2022?

Who can score the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2022?

0

As for the franchise tag, the Buccaneers could use it for the third straight year after only using it three times from 1993 to 2012.

The tagged Bucs Shaquil Barrett in 2020 and chris godvin in 2021. Another year of Super Bowl aspirations and expiring contracts for young players means the Bucs may have to use the tag, yet again, in order to help them navigate the salary cap.

Who could be in line to receive the tag? Before looking at three possibilities, be sure to check out the table below. It reflects the values ​​of the Franchise Tag and the Transition Tag in 2022.

2022 NFL Franchise and Transition Tag Values

Overthecap.com

The position of the player Franchise value 2022 Transition tag value 2022

Strategist

$28,598,000

$25,651,000

To recover

$12,536,000

$10,148,000

wide receiver

$19,127,000

$16,740,000

tight end

$10,834,000

$9,332,000

Offensive Lineman

$16,698,000

$14,997,000

defensive lineman

$16,880,000

$13,596,000

Linebacker

$17,417,000

$14,882,000

Cornerback

$17,295,000

$14,904,000

Security

$13,544,000

$11,265,000

Kicker/Punter

$5,469,000

$4,980,000

And keep in mind that if the Bucs decide to use the franchise tag, that money comes straight from the top in 2022. There’s no way to manipulate the cap unless the Bucs waive the tag. and sign the player to a long-term contract.


3.G Alex Cappa

The former DII offensive lineman has become a quality starter in his first four years in the league and will certainly have outside interest when it comes to his serves.

Tampa Bay’s offensive line has been integral to the franchise’s recent success. The top five played together for two seasons and four of the five have been together since 2019 – including Cappa.

It is unclear whether or not he will command the top prize. Cappa has never made a Pro Bowl or All-Pro or anything of that nature, but he’s top-20 at his position, which is starting caliber. And rookies get paid in the NFL.

All in all, both tags seem a bit high for Cappa, which will likely max out at around $9-11 million per year.

2. Jordan Whitehead

Whitehead is one of the most underrated safeties in the league. He will certainly be paid during the offseason.

But I’m not sure he’ll be paid near or more than $13 million a year, which is what it would cost to tag him. Teams pay that money for safeties that are elite in coverage and can also provide box support. Whitehead, despite being well covered, is best in the box, where he can help stop the run and be used as a blitzer.

The limitations should keep Whitehead from being tagged, but he’s a bit more of a viable option than Cappa based on the tag price for the safeties.

1. CB Carlton Davis III

Currently, Spotrac.com has the market value of Davis at $19.6 million per year. Admittedly, their system isn’t the ultimate solution when it comes to player ratings, but it’s reliable enough for us to use as a talking point.

Based on that valuation, the franchise tag would save the Bucs an estimated $2.3 million, but the key to signing Davis to a long-term deal is that the Bucs can manipulate the start. from the ceiling, if they wish.

What the beacon does is help buy time for both parties to work things out, but this process leaves the ceiling in a slight state of flux. That’s why the Bucs would go ahead and tag him and agree to do a long-term deal later.

Davis is a No. 1 corner in the NFL and Todd Bowles’ defense needs a guy in the backfield to lock down opposing receivers so the pass rush can come home. That, plus the fact that the Bucs could potentially save some money, makes Davis the No. 1 target for the tag; if the Bucs decide to use it.


Ultimately, Davis is truly the only viable option and the only pending free agent worth tagging. It’s not at all a lack of respect towards the other players. It’s simply a matter of overspending if the Bucs tag anyone other than Davis.

It wouldn’t be a good idea to tag Davis either, based on the Bucs’ current cap situation, but they might not have a choice. Especially if they want to keep it.

We’ll find out soon enough what the Bucs’ plans are, though, as the first day to use the franchise/transition tag is Feb. 22, which is just a few weeks away.

Stay tuned to AllBucs for more in-depth coverage of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and other NFL news and analysis. To follow on social networks @SIBuccaneers on Twitter and Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sports Illustrated on Facebook.